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German baking

Traditional Bavarian Pretzels | JavaCupcake.com

Traditional Bavarian Pretzels

Crisp, salty outside with a soft, chewy inside make these traditional Bavarian pretzels a delicious treat! Serve sliced with butter or mustard and you’ve got the perfect afternoon snack!

Traditional Bavarian Pretzels | JavaCupcake.com

It’s been on my bucket list to make the perfect replica of the German pretzels I’ve eaten for the last five years.  Crispy outside with big chunks of salt and then chewy, fluffy and so flavorful on the inside… the Germans do pretzels right!

Traditional Bavarian Pretzels | JavaCupcake.com

I’ve made pretzels before, but they were super soft and didn’t have that crunch I was looking for.  So, after the first of the year, I set out to find a recipe for the perfect Traditional Bavarian Pretzels.   I think I found it.

Traditional Bavarian Pretzels | JavaCupcake.com

Besides their smaller size (I had lots of people to share these with so I made them smaller), these pretzels taste almost identical to the pretzels from the local bakery.  My favorite way to serve them is sliced in half, smear butter on both sides, then sandwich back together to eat!  My husband loves to eat these pretzels with a coarse grain mustard.  You really can’t go wrong.

Traditional Bavarian Pretzels | JavaCupcake.com

Despite the 2-3 hours they took to make and the number of steps necessary to perfect these pretzels, the recipe only consists of 8 simple ingredients.  As a baker, I already have everything needed to make these, so I’m certain that you have all the ingredients in your cabinet as well.

Nothing fancy required.  Simple, yet delicious.  Pure pretzel perfection.

I also made a 90-second video (at the top) to show you just how simple it is to make these Traditional Bavarian Pretzels!

Enjoy!

Traditional Bavarian Pretzels

Yield: 18 pretzels
Prep Time: 3 hours
Cook Time: 21 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours 21 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 packet (1/4oz or 2 1/2 tsp) active dry yeast
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 50 ml lukewarm milk (no hotter than 110F)
  • 500 g (3 3/4 cup) all-purpose flour
  • 250 ml lukewarm milk
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 40 g unsalted butter
  • 1 liter water (4 cups)
  • 3 Tbsp baking soda
  • 1/4 cup coarse salt
  • 1/4 cup flour, for kneading
  • Food scale

Instructions

  1. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, stir gently together the yeast, sugar and 50 ml lukewarm milk. Let sit for 15 minutes until frothy.
  3. With the mixer on low, add the salt, flour and 250 ml lukewarm milk. Mix on medium-high speed for about 2 minutes until a dough ball forms. If all of the dough doesn't come up off the bottom of the bowl, add 1 Tbsp addition milk then mix again to form the ball.
  4. Cover the bowl with a damp towel and place in a very warm place to rise. The dough should double in size. This should take about 30-45 minutes if the room is warm enough. (Hint: Turn on the oven to 350F and crack it open to help heat the room.)
  5. On a lightly floured surface, knead the risen dough for about 2 minutes until smooth.
  6. Weigh the dough ball in grams and divide by 18. Make 18 even balls of dough.
  7. On a clean surface, roll each ball of dough into a sausage shape 30-35cm long with the center thicker than the ends. Form the dough into the pretzel shape and gently place on the prepared pan. Once all the dough is rolled and formed, let the pretzels rise for 20 minutes in a warm place. (NOTE: If the dough is not rising, it's not warm enough in your kitchen.)
  8. After they have risen, place the tray of pretzels in the refrigerator to chill for 1 hour.
  9. Prepare a second large baking sheet by generously spraying with cooking spray.
  10. After the pretzels have chilled, boil the water in a large pot and gently add the baking soda. (NOTE: The solution will bubble up violently so use caution when adding the baking soda.)
  11. Two at a time, using a slotted spoon or spatula, place the pretzels into the water. Flip them over a few times to coat them in water and boil for 30 seconds.
  12. Lift the pretzels out of the pot and tap to drain the water off. Place them on the greased baking sheet.
  13. Immediately sprinkle with coarse salt and cut a slit in the fattest part of the dough.
  14. If you are using a non-stick pan, place a second sheet directly under the sheet the pretzels are on. This will help prevent the bottoms from burning.
  15. In an unpreheated (cold) oven place the pan of pretzels on the upper-middle rack. Turn the oven on to 430F degrees and bake for 18-22 minutes or until the bottoms are a dark caramel brown color.
  16. Turn the oven onto high broil and continue baking 3-5 minutes or until the tops are crisp, dark caramel brown. Some of the smaller ends may even get dark brown.
  17. Allow to cool for 15 minutes then serve immediately. Best if eaten that day.
  18. To serve Bavarian style, slice the pretzels in half and smear both halves with butter. Sandwich back together and enjoy!
  19. The pretzels individually for 30 seconds in the boiling Natronwasser give (the pretzels swimming), get out with a slotted spoon, drain and sprinkle with coarse salt to taste. Thereafter, on a well greased baking sheet (do not use baking paper, the liquor destroyed it!). When the sheet is full, slide in a cold oven (!). An alarm clock on 18 minutes and put on 220 ° C (gas mark 4) heat. If the pretzels after about 18 - golden brown for 20 minutes they are ready.

 

German Christmas Stollen | JavaCupcake.com

German Christmas Stollen

Celebrate the holiday season with this traditional German Christmas Stollen filled with rum soaked raisins and topped with melted butter and sugar.  It’s the perfect accompaniment to morning coffee or afternoon tea!

German Christmas Stollen | JavaCupcake.com

Every Christmas season in Germany, the local bakeries produce the most magnificent bread that I eat dozens of loaves of.  This Weihnachtsstollen (Christmas Bread) dates back to the 1500’s in Germany when it was first made with oil because during the Advent season butter was prohibited.  This oil based dough was hard and tough and not as good as when made with butter.  Over time, the people were allowed to use butter in the Stollen and it evolved into a sweeter, fruit-filled dough versus the flavorless dough of the 1500’s.

Today, the most popular and historic Stollen comes from Dresden and is baked and sold at the Dresden Christmas Market.   This tradition has been taking place since the 1500’s and draws thousands of people to the market every Advent.

German Christmas Stollen | JavaCupcake.com

The traditional Stollen is baked in a long bell-shaped pan, but bakers all across Germany also bake it free form in an oval-shaped loaf like I made here.

Typically, I am not a fan of making yeasted dough, but I really wanted to learn to make my favorite German bread before I left Germany.  This dough begins by mixing the flour and yeast together then adding warmed butter and milk.  The technique works perfectly for me because I always seem to ruin the dough when I have to mix the yeast with sugar and warm milk first.  This method of adding everything at once to the mixer makes it practically impossible to mess up.

German Christmas Stollen | JavaCupcake.com

This recipe comes from a baking Facebook group that I’m a part of.  An older gentleman that’s in the group has been making hundreds of loaves of this German Christmas Stollen for decades and was kind enough to share his family recipe.

I tried his recipe exactly as he wrote it and I ended up burning the bottoms of the bread.  It still tasted amazing, just a little too brown on the underside with an aftertaste that was less than to be desired.

So, I tried the recipe again making a few adjustments.  I added more rum, raisins and candied orange to the dough as well as doubling up on the baking sheet, lowering the temperature and raising the rack in the oven.   All of these changes helped to make the perfect Weihnachtsstollen you see here!

German Christmas Stollen | JavaCupcake.com

I love how beautiful the Stollen looks on the platter with my Christmas decorations on my dining table.  Serve the Stollen with butter and a hot cup of coffee and you’ve got the perfect treat for friends and family.

German Christmas Stollen | JavaCupcake.com

I even got out my beautiful Bavarian porcelain and antique gold silverware to enjoy a cup of coffee and Stollen when my German friend Mariele came for a visit.  We sipped on coffee and ate as our children played.  It was perfect.

Do you have a favorite Christmas bread?  Have you ever made this Weihnachtsstollen before?  I’d love to hear about it!

Merry Christmas and Happy Baking!

German Christmas Stollen

German Christmas Stollen

Yield: 8 loaves
Prep Time: 6 hours
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 6 hours 35 minutes

Ingredients

Stollen

  • 3 cups raisins
  • 250g (one heaping cup) candied oranges
  • 3/4 cup white rum
  • 9 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 4 packages active dry yeast
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 cup unsalted butter
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 tsp almond extract
  • 1 grated & dried peels of an orange
  • 1 grated & dried peels of a lemon

Topping

  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted
  • 2-3 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 cup powdered sugar

Suggested Supplies

  • Oven size/large heavy/thick baking sheet (I used two large dark non-stick jelly-roll pans stacked on top of each other)
  • Parchment paper
  • Oven thermometer
  • Kitchen scale

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, combine the raisins, candied orange and rum. Soak for several hours or overnight.
  2. Grate the orange & lemon. Place the grated peels on a baking sheet and dry in at 225F oven for 5 minutes. Set aside until ready to use.
  3. In the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix together 3 cups of the flour and the yeast.
  4. In a medium saucepan, heat the milk, butter, sugar and salt the butter has melted and the mixture is warm stirring constantly to melt the butter. Remove from the heat and let cool for 5 minutes. Once cooled, but still warm, add this mixture to the flour & yeast and mix on low until combined.
  5. Scrape the sides of the bowl and add the beaten eggs, almond extract, and grated peels and mix on medium speed for 30 seconds.
  6. Scrape the sides again and mix on high for 3 minutes.
  7. By hand, stir in the raisins and oranges soaked in rum.
  8. Replace the paddle with the dough hook on the mixer. Add 5 cups of flour and turn the mixer on medium for 3-4 minutes.
  9. Remove the dough from the bowl and place on a counter covered in 1 cup of flour. Knead the flour into the dough for 4 minutes. Pat the dough into a large ball.
  10. Oil a large bowl and place the dough ball into the bowl, turning to coat the outside in the oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set in a warm, moist place for 90 minutes or until doubled in size.
  11. Punch down dough 3-4 times.
  12. Remove the dough from the bowl divide into 8 even pieces. I weighed the dough in grams then divided by 8. I weighed each dough ball to the same size to ensure consistency among my loaves.
  13. Cover with a towel and let rest for 10 minutes.
  14. Form each piece of weighed dough into an oval shaped loaf the place on a baking sheet covered in parchment paper.
  15. Once all the dough is on the baking sheet, cover with a cloth and let rise until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.
  16. Preheat oven to 375F degrees if using a light baking sheet. Preheat oven to 350F degrees if using a non-stick/dark baking sheet.
  17. Bake the dough for 30 minutes on the top rack in your oven. Rotate the pan 180 degrees then bake 5 more minutes. Check the bottom of the loaves to ensure they are not burning. Bake 5 more minutes if necessary but do not over bake! The loaves will be perfect when the bottoms are golden and the tops are firm and a light brown.
  18. Remove the baked loaves from the sheet and allow them to cool on racks until completely cool.
  19. Place the 2-3 cups of sugar into a rectangle baking dish.
  20. Brush melted butter over the entire top surface of each loaf the place in the baking dish with the sugar. Scoop the sugar over the entire loaf so it's covered completely. Tap off any extra and then place back on the cooling rack. Repeat with all the loaves.
  21. Dust a generous amount of powdered sugar over the top of each loaf.
  22. Wrap in plastic wrap or place in a gift bag for storage. Do not place in a plastic box, the sugar will melt into the bread.
  23. The Stollen will stay fresh for 2-3 days but after that will begin to dry out. It's best if enjoyed immediately!

Check out these other German recipes I have made since living here!

Lebkuchen - a traditional German holiday cookie made with almonds, spices and honey | JavaCupcake.com

Lebkuchen – Traditional German Christmas Cookies

Schokokipferl | JavaCupcake.com #OXOGoodCookies

Schokokipferl – A twist on a German classic

Apfeltasche - German Apple Turnover | JavaCupcake.com

Apfeltasche – A German apple turnover

Schokokipferl | JavaCupcake.com #OXOGoodCookies

Schokokipferl

With the holiday cookie season right around the corner, these traditional chocolate German cookies called Schokokipferl, will make the perfect addition to your cookie baking this season!

Schokokipferl | JavaCupcake.com #OXOGoodCookies

I love holiday baking and I especially love making Christmas cookies!  Last week I saw a magazine at the German gas station that was filled with only German Christmas baking.  Everything from cookies to bars to muffins and cakes.  So naturally, I had to buy it.  In this magazine was this recipe for a chocolate version of one of my favorite German holiday cookies, Kipferl.

Schokokipferl | JavaCupcake.com #OXOGoodCookies

Traditionally,  Kipferl are vanilla flavored and covered in powdered or granulated sugar.   For this recipe, however, cocoa powder is added to the simple dough and it is covered in drizzles of white and milk chocolate.

Simple yet so incredibly delicious!

You know what else is great about cookies?  The tools you use to make them!  OXO products for baking are some of my favorites and they recently sent me 3 new items to try out!

Schokokipferl | JavaCupcake.com #OXOGoodCookies

I love love love love this sheet pan.  I was a bit reluctant at first not to put any parchment paper on it but I am happy to say that none of my cookies stuck to the pan!  The grooved bottom of the pan worked amazingly well to give my cookies a beautiful brown bottom without burning or sticking!

I’ve never owned a cookie scoop before, so I was anxious to try it out with these cookies.  I probably didn’t need to use it, but it worked great to portion out the sizes of the cookies.

Schokokipferl | JavaCupcake.com #OXOGoodCookies

The OXO Cookie Spatula is the perfect size for transferring cookies from the baking pan to the cooling rack.  It fits one cookie perfectly and doesn’t scrape the pan.

JavaCupcake.com #OXOGoodCookiesCookies for Kids’ Cancer was founded by two OXOnians (OXO employees) who were inspired by their son Liam’s battle with pediatric cancer, a disease which claims the lives of more children in the US than any other disease. Cookies for Kids’ Cancer provides inspiration and support to allow anyone to easily get involved in fundraising to find a cure for pediatric cancer.

OXOnians regard each other as family. The news of Liam’s diagnosis hit them hard and they have been personally involved with this worthy organization from the beginning. As a formal show of support, in 2015, OXO will donate up to $100,000* to support Cookies for Kids’ Cancer.

So run out to the store, buy any OXO product with this green Cookies for Kids’ Cancer sticker on it and OXO will donate money to help find a cure for pediatric cancer.  Then bake these Schokokipferl and share them with those you love during the holiday season.

Cookies for Kids’ Cancer is a recognized 501c(3) public charity duly incorporated under the laws of the state of New Jersey. Your donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent allowable by law. 100% of proceeds raised by Cookies for Kids’ Cancer fund pediatric cancer research.
OXO will be donating $100 to Cookies for Kids’ Cancer for each blog post dedicated to this campaign in October (up to our $100,000 commitment*.)
*In 2015, OXO will donate up to $100,000 to Cookies for Kids’ Cancer through product proceeds, bake sale matches and other fundraising efforts.
Although I was compensated by OXO with product for this post, all opinions are my own. 
Schokokipferl

Schokokipferl

Yield: 2 dozen
Prep Time: 4 hours
Cook Time: 14 minutes
Total Time: 4 hours 14 minutes

Ingredients

Cookies

  • 100g ground Hazelnuts
  • 150g all-purpose flour (or 405 flour)
  • 100g powdered sugar
  • 20g dark chocolate cocoa powder
  • pinch of salt
  • 150g unsalted butter, cold and cubed
  • 2 egg yolks, cold
  • 50g white chocolate
  • 50g milk chocolate
  • 2 Tbsp heavy cream, divided
  • 1 tsp butter, divided

Supplies

  • OXO Non-Stick Half Sheet Pan
  • OXO Medium Cookie Scoop
  • OXO Cookie Spatula

Instructions

  1. Sift together the flour, powdered sugar, cocoa powder and salt into the bowl of a food processor.
  2. Cut the butter into cubes and add it to the flour mixture and process on low until the butter has been cut into small pieces and the mixture resembles a coarse meal.
  3. Add the egg yolks and process until the mixture comes together and a dough ball forms.
  4. Form the dough into a ball and wrap it in plastic wrap. Press is slightly to flatten. Chill for at least 1 hour in the refrigerator.
  5. Preheat oven to 350F degrees.
  6. Get out your OXO Non-Stick Half Sheet Pan and set it aside. No need to line with parchment paper or use non-stick spray.
  7. Lightly dust your work surface with powdered sugar. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and place on your work surface.
  8. Using the OXO Medium Cookie Scoop, scoop 1 heaping ball of dough. Roll the dough into a 2 cm thick log and cut it in half.
  9. Schokokipferl | JavaCupcake.com #OXOGoodCookies
  10. Roll each piece a bit on the ends to make them smaller and come to a soft point. Fold the dough into a crescent moon shape (the traditional Kipferl form). Repeat with the remaining dough.
  11. Place each cookie on the OXO Non-Stick Half Sheet Pan and bake for 12-14 minutes or until firm.
  12. Allow the cookies to cool on the pan for 5 minutes before removing with the OXO Cookie Spatula to a wire rack to cool completely.
  13. Once the cookies are cool, prepare the chocolates. Heat each chocolate plus 1 Tbsp of heavy cream & 1/2 tsp of butter in separate microwave safe bowls in 30 second increments until melted. Stir the chocolate after each time int he microwave.
  14. Pour the melted chocolate into a ziplock bag. Cut the tip off the bag and drizzle each chocolate over the cookies. Let the cookies set several hours until the chocolate is firm.

Notes

The way I rolled & cut the dough makes large Kipferl. If you want a more traditional German cookie, roll the dough into smaller 1cm pieces before forming and baking.

 

Apfeltasche - German Apple Turnover | JavaCupcake.com

Apfeltasche – German Apple Turnover

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of KitchenAid. All opinions and text are mine.

Apfeltasche - German Apple Turnover | JavaCupcake.com

I am inspired by the world around me every day to create and try new things in the kitchen.  Recently, I’ve been seeing pastries pop up in the local German bakeries filled will delicious apples.  The Apfeltasche or the Apple Turnover is one of my husband’s absolute favorite goodie from the bakery so I knew I had to try and recreate it at home!

I absolutely love my KitchenAid Stand Mixer and use it any chance I get.  This Apfeltasche recipe is the perfect opportunity to use my KitchenAid Stand Mixer because it requires the use of both the paddle and and dough hook to make the dough.

If you don’t know anything about KitchenAid, you really should check out KitchenAid’s new line of black stainless steel appliances.  It’s sleek, sexy and top of the line!

Apfeltasche - German Apple Turnover | JavaCupcake.com

I was especially inspired by this recipe because the dough calls for the use of Quark.  If you aren’t farmiliar with Quark is a warmed soured milk that is strained until you have a thick creamy cheese left.  It is similar to cottage cheese, ricotta or mascarpone.  Since quark is hard to find in the USA, I used mascarpone in this recipe.  The quark is mixed with oil and eggs before flour is added.

One of the best things about German baking is that their pastries are not overly sweet.  This recipe is no exception.

Apfeltasche - German Apple Turnover | JavaCupcake.com

The apples are really the star of this apple turnover.  Tart Granny Smith apples are used to fill the turnover and are simply spiced with sugar and cinnamon.  Each bite of this turnover is a bit sweet but a lot tart, delicious apple.  Serving this Apfeltasche with a cup of coffee would be the perfect Sunday morning treat for you and your loved one.

Do you have a favorite apple recipe?  A recipe that stands out from the crowd? KitchenAid & The Food Network want to see your recipe for a chance to win some amazing prizes!  To enter is simple.  Make your favorite apple recipe, snap a photo and upload it to Instagram or Twitter and use the hashtag #KitchenAidContest.  So simple!  Your recipe could win you a private cooking lesson with Chef Zakarian and the new black stainless suite of appliances from KitchenAid.

Apfeltasche

Yield: 8
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 50 minutes

Ingredients

Filling

  • 1 kg (6 medium) Granny Smith Apples
  • 1 Vanilla bean, seeded
  • 50 g (¼ cup) Sugar
  • 6 EL (½ cup + 2 Tbsp) Water
  • 4 Tbsp Apple juice
  • 1 Tbsp Corn starch
  • ¼ tsp Cinnamon

Dough

  • 600 g (5 cups, not packed) Flour
  • 2 tsp Baking powder
  • 300 g (1 ¼ cup) Quark or Mascarpone
  • 200 g (1 cup) Sugar
  • 10 EL (½ cup + 2 Tbsp) Milk
  • 10 EL (½ cup + 2 Tbsp) Vegetable oil

Assembly

  • 1 Egg, separated
  • 1 Tbsp water
  • Powdered sugar, for dusting

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 200 C or 390 F. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.

Filling

  1. Peel, core and small cube apples and place them in a medium pan. Mix corn starch with the apple juice then pour it over the apples. Add water, lemon juice, cinnamon, sugar and vanilla bean seeds and mix until combined. Heat to high then reduce to low and simmer for about 5 minutes or until the apples are just soft, but still firm to the touch and the liquid has begun to thicken. Remove from the heat and allow to cool.

Dough

  1. In the bowl of your stand mixer with the paddle, combine the mascarpone, oil, milk and sugar and mix until combined. In another bowl, whisk together the flour and baking powder. Gently add the flour to the wet ingredients and mix with the dough hook until just combined.
  2. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead 2-3 times. DO NOT overwork the dough. Roll the dough out into a large rectangle, very thin rectangle. Cut 16 rectangles from the dough.
  3. On 8 of the dough pieces, cut 4-5 slits across the middle of the dough to create vents. Arrange the remaining pieces of cut dough on the prepared baking sheet. Brush egg whites on the outside edges of each piece then spoon apple filling in the center. Spoon as much of the apple filling as you can on to the dough. The apples will cook down so you want to use up all of the apple in the filling.
  4. Place a vented piece of dough on top of the apple filling with the floured side down. Pinch the sides of the dough together until sealed. Brush the top of the turnover with egg yolk mixed with 1 Tbsp of water. Repeat this process with the remaining pieces.
  5. Bake for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown.
  6. Once cooled, sprinkle with powdered sugar.

From the first-ever black stainless steel to the first-ever five-door refrigerator, KitchenAid pushes the limits with our appliances, so our home cooks can do the same with their cooking. See the revolutionary new line of KitchenAid appliances or visit the Kitchenthusiast™ blog for recipes, tips and more.

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of KitchenAid. The opinions and text are all mine.

Osterlamm - German Easter Lamb Cake | JavaCupcake.com

Osterlamm – German Easter Lamb Cake

Simple, buttery cake topped with powdered sugar baked in a lamb shaped pan makes the utterly delicious and traditional German Osterlamm or Easter Lamb Cake!Osterlamm - German Easter Lamb Cake | JavaCupcake.com

 

I wasn’t going to post this cake.  I mean, Easter is over and it’s not really something just anyone can make.  You have to have the special Osterlamm pan to make and those are hard to get unless you live in Germany.  But, when I got asked a dozen times for the recipe, I decided that it was probably a good idea to put it up!Osterlamm - German Easter Lamb Cake | JavaCupcake.com

My German friend Mareile remembers her Oma (Grandma) making Osterlamm when she was a child and today Mareile makes it for her two children.  Our babies, Matty & Lena, were born 2 weeks apart from each other and are baby BFFs now!   This picture was from their first Easter together in 2012.

Osterlamm - German Easter Lamb Cake | JavaCupcake.com

For most of the world, the Osterlamm is just a delicious treat, but here in Bavaria, Germany it has a more important meaning for those who believe the Catholic faith. The symbolism of the lamb goes back to the Passover lamb, which is sacrificed in Judaism for Passover. Because Jesus was Jewish, the Last Supper took place on the evening of Passover and he was crucified on the day (sacrificed) was, this symbolism has arisen. In Germany, a lamb is sacrificed at Easter, but baked in commemoration of the resurrection, a cake in the shape of an Easter lamb.

Osterlamm - German Easter Lamb Cake | JavaCupcake.com

In the weeks preceding Easter, each bakery bakes and sells hundreds of these cakes.  Some are covered in powdered sugar, some a lemon glaze and some even cover them in chocolate and candies.  My favorite is with the powdered sugar and then dunked in my coffee! So delish!

You can get your own Lamm-backform (cake pan) here or here!

I’m definitely making this a new Easter tradition for my family!

Enjoy!

Osterlamm

Osterlamm

Yield: 1 lamb
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes

Ingredients

  • 120g unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 110g granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 Tbsp vanilla extract (or 1 packet of vanilla sugar)
  • 160g all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp whole milk
  • powdered sugar for dusting
  • Osterbackform "Lamm" (Easter Lamb Pan) - 27.5cm x 15cm x 6.5cm

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 350F or 180C degrees. Butter and flour the inside of the lamb pan and clip the sides back together. Place the lamb pan on a baking sheet UPSIDE DOWN.
  2. Cream together the butter and sugar for about 2 minutes.
  3. One at a time, add the eggs and mix well after each egg. Add the vanilla extract and mix to combine.
  4. In another bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt. Add this to the butter/sugar and mix until just combined. Scrape down the sides of the bowl, add the milk and mix until smooth - no more than about a minute. You don't want to overwork the batter.
  5. Pour all the batter into the prepared lamb pan and smooth out the top. Bake for 45 minutes.
  6. Allow the lamb to cool in the pan for about 10 minutes before removing it to a wire rack to cool completely.
  7. Trim off any excess cake from the seams. If the lamb does not sit upright, trim a little off the bottom to make it level.
  8. Dust the cake with powdered sugar.
  9. Optionally, you can melt a bit of chocolate and pipe on ears and eyes. Also, you can tie a ribbon around the lambs neck.
  10. Serve immediately!

 

German-style Salted Pretzels with Spicy Beer Mustard | The JavaCupcake Blog https://javacupcake.com

German-style Salted Pretzels with Spicy Beer Mustard

Living in Germany has taught me to love pretzels!  These German-style Salted Pretzels with Spicy Beer Mustard are just like what we get here in Germany!

German-style Salted Pretzels with Spicy Beer Mustard | The JavaCupcake Blog https://javacupcake.com

Almost everyday here in Germany, I go to the bakery and buy at least 2 German style pretzels.  They are big, soft and chewy on the inside and have a crust covered in big chunks of salt.

A lot of people like to dip their pretzels in cheese or mustard, but I like mine plain with an ice cold Pepsi.  So yumm!

Traditional Bavarian Pretzels | JavaCupcake.com

One of the blogs I follow posted a recipe for pretzels and that got me to thinking that I could make my very own German style pretzels at home and have them fresh any time I wanted. So, I set out on a search of the internet for recipes.

 

I read 7 or so recipes for pretzels and decided I’d combine the dough recipe from The Fresh Loaf, the cooking style from Alton Brown and the mustard from My Fare Foodie.  Of course all of them with my own twist on things!

The first batch out of the oven turned out smelling and looking so good that I had to taste one right off the pan.  OH. MY. HEAVENS!  It tasted the same, if not BETTER, than the ones I get in the German bakeries! Soft and chewy on the inside and a firm crust with salt, lots of yummy salt!

I made traditional pretzel twist and then a few sticks.  Both were perfect for dipping in the mustard sauce made with German beer.  Really, you could make the sauce with any kind of beer you like, but I used a Dunkelweisen my husband likes.

German-style Salted Pretzels with German Beer Spicy Mustard

German-style Salted Pretzels with German Beer Spicy Mustard

Yield: 18 3-4in pretzels & 12 pretzel twists - 1 1/2 cups dipping sauce

Ingredients

Pretzels

  • 1 package Active Dry yeast (or about 1 tbsp)
  • 2 cups warm milk (2 minutes, 30 seconds in my microwave on high)
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • 5 cups bread flour
  • 2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tbsp melted butter
  • non-stick cooking spray or butter for greasing
  • 1 egg yolk + 1 tbsp water
  • coarse salt
  • 10 cups of water
  • 2/3 cup baking soda
  • parchment paper
  • large baking sheet
  • 2 spatulas

Mustard

  • 9 heaping tbsp course grain mustard
  • 3 heaping tbsp spicy brown mustard
  • 3 heaping tsp horseradish
  • 3 tbsp German Dunkelweisen (or your favorite Hefeweisen or Lager beer)
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • salt/pepper to taste

Instructions

Pretzels

  1. Grease a large bowl with butter, set aside.
  2. Heat the milk in a microwave safe cup that pours. After warm, mix in the brown sugar and yeast. Let stand for 10 minutes or until it begins to foam. This step activates the yeast.
  3. In a stand mixer with a hook attachment (or in a large bowl with a wooden spoon) mix together the flour and salt.
  4. With the mixer on low-medium, slowly add the melted butter and milk until combined. My mixer didn't really enjoy this too much, so I took the hook out and finished incorporating the ingredients by hand.
  5. Lightly flour a flat surface and knead the dough until it's smooth and all the ingredients are combined. About 5 minutes.
  6. Form the dough into a large ball and place it in the greased bowl. Cover with with plastic wrap and set it in a warm place for about an hour or until the dough doubles. (I waited an hour and my dough hadn't exactly doubled, but I was in a time crunch and just went with it. They still turned out yummy!)
  7. Bring the water and baking soda to a boil in a large pot. Line your baking sheet with parchment paper and lightly spray with non stick cooking spray or butter. Preheat your oven to 425 F degrees.
  8. In the meantime, grease a flat surface (like your counter) with butter or cooking spray. Roll out your dough about 1/4in thick into a large rectangle.
  9. Cut 1in slices of dough. Roll them out about 15 inches long. If you roll them too long, you can fold them in half and cut them. It's really up to you how big you want them. The thicker you roll the dough, the thicker the pretzel you'll have. Shape the dough into a pretzel or twist. Place on prepared baking sheet.
  10. Once you've rolled out enough pretzels to fit on the baking sheet, you'll begin the boiling process. First, beat the egg and water together in a small bowl, set aside.
  11. One at a time, place one pretzel on your spatula then place the second spatula on top, like a sandwich. This will help you keep control of your pretzel. Submerge the pretzel into the boiling water for 30 seconds or until the pretzel floats to the surface. You'll want to hold onto the pretzel with the spatulas for about 10 seconds before letting go. This will help make sure the pretzels keeps it's shape. The larger pretzels I did 1 at a time, but I found that 3-4 smaller twists were okay to boil at once. The Fresh Loaf has a great tutorial on how to do this, which is where I learned. Place the boiled pretzel back on the prepared sheet.
  12. Once all the pretzels are boiled, brush each with the egg wash and sprinkle with coarse salt. I used sea salt because it's what I had on hand, but your favorite coarse salt would work.
  13. Bake the pretzels for about 15 minutes or until browned.
  14. Eat immediately! Or you can let them cool on a wire rack.

Mustard

  1. Combine all the ingredients in a bowl. Mix.
  2. Add/omit/change it to your taste!

 

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